by Dean R. Larson, CPT, PhD, CEM, CSP, CBCLA, PEM

Successful professionals often assess their lives to determine whether their current activities add value and result in satisfaction. Achieving and maintaining certification as a performance technologist continues to meet these two criteria in my life. The 10 Standards of Performance Technology provide a continuous guide for my activities, which include university teaching, consulting on building resilience, safety officer on an All-Hazards Incident Management Team, chair of a technical community for development of consensus standards, and a field representative of the U.S. Naval Academy.  In the table presented below, I have assessed my use of the Standards of Performance Technology in order of importance. The first listed number is most important and the last is least important.

The 10 Standards of Performance Technology:

  1. Focus on results or outcomes
  2. Take a systematic view
  3. Add value
  4. Work in partnership with clients
  5. Determine need or opportunity
  6. Determine cause
  7. Design solutions including implementation and evaluation
  8. Ensure solutions’ conformity and feasibility
  9. Implement solutions
  10. Evaluate results and impact
Activity Standards in order of importance for the activity
University teaching–Capella, Saint Xavier, and Oklahoma State–paid 4 – 6 – 3 – 1 – 10 – 7
Consulting on building resilience–emergency preparedness, security, safety, training–paid 4 – 2 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8 – 10 – 3
Safety officer on All-Hazards Incident Management Team (Type 3), District One Indiana–volunteer 4 – 2 – 1 – 5 – 6- 7 – 8 – 10
Chair of a technical community for development of consensus standards–NFPA Common Mass Evacuation Planning –volunteer 4 – 8 – 5 – 2 – 1 – 3 – 7 – 10
Field representative for U.S. Naval Academy–Naval Academy Information Officer–volunteer 4 – 8 – 3 – 1 – 2

 

Dean LarsonAbout the Author
Dean R. Larson, CPT, PhD, CEM, CSP, CBCLA, PEM, is president of Larson Performance Consulting LLC, which focuses on risk management and resilience building. He also teaches master’s students in homeland security, emergency management, and business continuity and mentors doctoral candidates in emergency management at Capella University. Larson retired as a captain from the U.S. Navy with 30 years of service as a special operations and surface warfare officer. He continues to serve as a Naval Academy information officer.